A Text Book Of Practical Botany 1

Table of Content

  1. Introduction:
    Preamble 1, Laboratory etiquette 1, Work plan 1, Necessary instruments 1, Microscope 1, Other laboratory provisions 4, Fixing agents and preservatives 4, Laboratory techniques 4, Record of work 11, Herbarium

2.Algae:
Preamble 16, Classification 20, Chlamydomonas 21, Volvox 22, Chiarella 24, Hydrodictyon 25, Cladophora 26, Fritschiella 28, Coleochaete 29, Oedogonium 31, Zygnema 34, Chara 36, Vaucheria 40, Diatoms 43, Ectocarpus 45, Fucus 47, Sargassum 50, Batrachospermum 55, Ceramium 56, Polysiphonia 59, Oscillatoria 63, Nostoc 64, Scytonema 66, Rivularia 67, Gloeotrichia 68

  1. Fungi 70 – 130
    Preamble 70, Classification 71, Plasmodiophora 74, Synchytrium 77, Saprolegnia 79, Achlya 81, Phytophthora 83, Albugo 86, Rhizopus 89, Erysiphe 92, Sphaerotheca 95, Phyllactinia 97, Aspergillus 99, Penicillium 102, Claviceps 103, Peziza 106, Ascobolus 107, Morchella 109, Ustilago 111, Puccinia 114, Agaricus 120, Polyporus 122, Alternaria 124, Cercospora 126, Colletotrichum 128.
  2. Lichens :Ascolichens 131, Crustose lichens 131, Foliose lichens 132, Fruticose lichens 134, Basidiolichens 136. etc.

About Book

Title: A Text Book Of Practical Botany – 1
Author: Ashok M. Bendre
Length: 324 pages
Publisher: Rastogi Publications (2009)
Language: English
ISBN-10: 8171339239
ISBN-13: 978-8171339235

Biophysics – An Introduction

Biophysics is an evolving, multidisciplinary subject that applies physics to biological systems and promotes an understanding of their physical properties and behavior. Biophysics: An Introduction, is a concise balanced introduction to this subject. Written in an accessible and readable style, the book takes a fresh, modern approach with the author successfully combining key concepts and theory with relevant applications and examples drawn from the field as a whole.

Beginning with a brief introduction to the origins of biophysics, the book takes the reader through successive levels of complexity, from atoms to molecules, structures, systems and ultimately to the behaviour of organisms. The book also includes extensive coverage of biopolymers, biomembranes, biological energy, and nervous systems. The text not only explores basic ideas, but also discusses recent developments, such as protein folding, DNA/RNA conformations, molecular motors, optical tweezers and the biological origins of consciousness and intelligence.

* Is a carefully structured introduction to biological and medical physics
* Provides exercises at the end of each chapter to encourage student understanding
Assuming little biological or medical knowledge, this book is invaluable to undergraduate students in physics, biophysics and medical physics. The book is also useful for graduate students and researchers looking for a broad introduction to the subject.

About Book

Title: Biophysics: An Introduction
Author: Rodney Cotterill
Publisher: John Wiley & Sons, 2003
ISBN: 0470854561, 9780470854563
Length: 408 pages

Elements of Ecology

This work has been selected by scholars as being culturally important, and is part of the knowledge base of civilization as we know it. This work was reproduced from the original artifact, and remains as true to the original work as possible. Therefore, you will see the original copyright references, library stamps (as most of these works have been housed in our most important libraries around the world), and other notations in the work.

This work is in the public domain in the United States of America, and possibly other nations. Within the United States, you may freely copy and distribute this work, as no entity (individual or corporate) has a copyright on the body of the work.

As a reproduction of a historical artifact, this work may contain missing or blurred pages, poor pictures, errant marks, etc. Scholars believe, and we concur, that this work is important enough to be preserved, reproduced, and made generally available to the public. We appreciate your support of the preservation process and thank you for being an important part of keeping this knowledge alive and relevant.

“Live Alone and Like It” is a slogan that no living thing can adopt. Every plant and animal is subject to both the living and the non-living influences of its surroundings. Every organism depends upon its environment to supply it with vital materials and energy. Every living being must share its world with members of its own species and with members of other species be they friend or foe. Man is no exception. Man is surrounded by many kinds of living things, and he must derive his needs from the world around him.

Man must learn to live in adjustment with his fellow men, and with the plants and animals of his environment, and to use his natural resources judiciously, or he will be exterminated. Obviously, then, the interrelations of the organism and its environment are crucial; and ecology, which is the study of these interrelations, is of great significance. Yet few books are available which deal with the general principles of the whole subject. Most of the books in the field of ecology treat primarily either “plant ecology” or “animal ecology.” But animals cannot get along without plants, and plants are almost always vitally influenced by animals. Man is dependent upon both.

About Book

Title: Elements of Ecology
Author: Geoge L. Clarke
Length: 560 pages
Publisher: John Wiley & Sons Inc (1 December 1965)
Language: English
ISBN-10: 0471159751
ISBN-13: 978-0471159759

EVOLUTION: Process and Product

There are fashions in science as in all other things, and the study of evolution is at present highly fashionable among biologists. This is reflected not only by the immense number of technical papers on various aspects of evolution which are published annually but also by the fact that courses in evolution are presented in many colleges and universities, while most courses in biological departments deal with evolution to some extent. Our generation has witnessed a complete reversal of the character of evolutionary thinking. During the early decades of the present century, after the great enthusiasm of the immediate post-Darwinian era had spent itself, widespread pessimism prevailed regarding the very possibility of gaining any real insight into the mechanics of evolution.

This pessimism was based upon many things, including a psychological reaction against the unbridled and uncritical enthusiasm of post-Darwinian biologists; a misconstruction of the significance of the new science of genetics; the disrepute into which taxonomy had fallen; and the mutation theory of the DeVries, which seemed to make Darwinian variation and selection unnecessary. Even while this pessimism prevailed, however, its bases were being destroyed by research in many apparently unrelated fields.

In 1937, Dobzhansky published Genetics and the Origin of Species, in which he brought together many lines of research, and demonstrated that the prospects were bright indeed for understanding the mechanics of evolution in terms of the genetics of natural populations. This stimulated a reassessment of the relationship of many biological sciences (and some of the physical sciences) to evolution, and the result has been a modern synthesis in which all biological sciences seem to converge fruitfully upon evolution. This modern synthesis has been formalized in a series of books of such importance that any one of them would have required the revision of existing texts and justified the publications of new ones. Dobzhansky’s book, which is now in its third edition, was the first of these. It was followed in 1940 by Goldschmidt’s Material Basis of Evolution, in 1943 by Mayr’s Systematics and the Origin of Species, in 1945 by Simpson’s Tempo and Mode in Evolution, in 1950 by Stebbins’ Variation and Evolution in Plants, in 1953 by Simpson’s Major Features of Evolution, and in 1957 by Darlington’s Zoogeography. In addition to these books, an enormous amount of valuable evolutionary research has been published in a host of technical
journals.

About Book

Title: EVOLUTION: Process and Product
Author: EDWARD 0. DODSON
Publisher:
REINHOLD PUBLISHING CORPORATION NEW YORK
Pages:
370

Economic Zoology: An Introductory Text-Book in Zoology

This work has been selected by scholars as being culturally important, and is part of the knowledge base of civilization as we know it. This work was reproduced from the original artifact, and remains as true to the original work as possible. Therefore, you will see the original copyright references, library stamps (as most of these works have been housed in our most important libraries around the world), and other notations in the work.This work is in the public domain in the United States of America, and possibly other nations. Within the United States, you may freely copy and distribute this work, as no entity (individual or corporate) has a copyright on the body of the work.As a reproduction of a historical artifact, this work may contain missing or blurred pages, poor pictures, errant marks, etc. Scholars believe, and we concur, that this work is important enough to be preserved, reproduced, and made generally available to the public. We appreciate your support of the preservation process, and thank you for being an important part of keeping this knowledge alive and relevant.

About Book

Title: Economic Zoology: An Introductory Text-Book in Zoology,
Author: Herbert Osborn
Publisher: Lightning Source UK Ltd
Language: English
ISBN-10: 1376414937
ISBN-13: 978-1376414936

The principles of insect physiology

INSECTS PROVIDE an ideal medium in which to study all the problems of physiology. But if this medium is to be used to the best advantage, the principles and peculiarities of the insect’s organization must be first appreciated. It is the purpose of this book to set forth these principles so far as they are understood in the present day. There exist already many excellent text-books of general entomology; notably, those of Imms, Weber, and Snodgrass, to mention only the more recent. But these authors have necessarily been preoccupied chiefly with describing the diversity of form among insects; discussions on the function being correspondingly condensed.

In the present work, the emphasis is reversed. The structure is described only to an extent sufficient to make the physiological argument intelligible. Every anatomical peculiarity, every ecological specialization, has indeed its physiological counterpart. In that sense, anatomy, physiology, and ecology are not separable. But regarded from the standpoint from which the present work is written, the endless modifications that are met with among insects are but illustrations of the general principles of their physiology, which is the aim of this book to set forth.

Completeness in such a work is not possible, or desirable, but an endeavor has been made to illustrate each physiological characteristic by a few concrete examples and to include sufficient references to guide the student to the more important sources. The physiology of insects is to some the handmaid of Economic Entomology. For although it is not the purpose of physiology to furnish directly the means of controlling insect pests, yet the rational application of measures of control whether these be insecticides of one sort or another or artificial interferences with the insect’s environment is often dependent on a knowledge of the physiology of the insect in question. Physiology may thus serve to rationalize existing procedures or to discover the weak spots in the ecological armor of a species. Knowledge of the ecology of a species is always necessary to its effective control; its ecology can be properly understood only when its physiology is known.

About Book

Title: The Principles of Insect Physiology
Author: Vincent B. Wigglesworth
Publisher: Chapman and Hall; 7th Revised edition edition (26 October 1972)
Language: English
ISBN-10: 0412114909
ISBN-13: 978-0412114908
Close Bitnami banner
Bitnami